Private Voice Teachers: Finding your "niche" Market

  • What is Niche Marketing? 

Concentrating all marketing efforts on a small but specific and well defined segment of the population. Niches do not 'exist' but are 'created' by identifying needs, wants, and requirements that are being addressed poorly or not at all by other firms, and developing and delivering goods or services to satisfy them. As a strategy, niche marketing is aimed at being a big fish in a small pond instead of being a small fish in a big pond. 

Read more: http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/niche-marketing.html#ixzz3TXaISBF2

Why is niche marketing important for the Private Voice Teacher?

When I started teaching voice lessons, twenty years ago. I didn't think much about what kind of students I wanted to instruct. Employed in a retail music store with a music lesson department, I inherited a motley crew of students left behind by the teacher before me. I taught students of all ages, abilities, and genres. I had few teaching resources and no other voice teachers on staff for support. I struggled for several years, had a high turnover of students, made no money and found teaching to be very stressful. Truthfully, I hated teaching.

In time and with some well-earned experience, teaching became more enjoyable and much more profitable. The big changes happened when I could clearly define the type of students I preferred to teach. How a teacher determines which students they are best to work with depends on many things, namely a teacher’s:

  • formal education/private education
  • repertoire preferences
  • performance experience
  • teaching experience
  • religious background
  • location and type of teaching studio
  • performance opportunities we can offer our students
  • and our AGE

I have noticed my colleagues who are extraordinarily successful with their teaching studios cater to a clearly defined niche of students.

They KNOW their people.

Some have more than one niche, but the word is out that they prefer and excel with a particular demographic of student. It is evident to all who know them what they love to do! Their studios are busy, and they often have a wait list of students.

Truth Bomb: If you are teaching in a populated area, there are more than enough vocal music students to go around. If your studio isn't busy, perhaps you have not defined your student “niche.” If you have identified your market - have you let your connections (student base, community, lesson administrator, colleagues and social media) know?

Listen to Podcast: Finding Your Dream Students

Take a moment and think about the students you enjoy teaching. Can you narrow it down?  
Perhaps there is a niche of singers you haven’t thought about before?

  • Early beginners ages 6-8 (my favourite!)
  • Children 8-12
  • High School Teens
  • University/college audition prep students
  • University/ college level students
  • Young adults (my least favourite)
  • Avocational Adult students
  • Professional Vocalists (career development)
  • Baby Boomers (this is a growing student base for many voice teachers)

You can also specialize in specific music genres. Not a fan of pop music? Perhaps you would enjoy working with older singers. The Baby Boomers aren't interested in singing Ariana Grande either.

Define your niche. Spread the word. Enjoy and profit from your busy teaching studio.
 

~ Happy Teaching - Nikki